Help Centre

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  1. Why are gases and smoke entering the room when the door is opened? 28/10/2020

    The most likely reason for this is that your flue is clogged and may require sweeping.

    Other possible causes:

    • You could have a very cold flue temperature. Allow initial start up fire to warm flue pipes. 
    • Loading door opened during maximum degassing of fuel. Wait until flames disappear.

     

     

  2. How do I use my re-usable fire starters? 28/10/2020

    Place the soaked fire starter in the front of the fire chamber just underneath the front of your kindling. When the fire has started use tongs to remove it and place somewhere safe to cool down. When the fire starter is cold, place into a jar of methylated spirits for storage. 

    Warning

    • NEVER leave methylated spirits near the lit fire
    • NEVER soak a hot fire starter in methylated spirits 
    • NEVER squirt spirits or any liquid fuels directly into the fire chamber

     

     

  3. How do I light my first fire? 28/10/2020

    1. Soak the reusable fire starters in methylated spirits. Tip: It is also handy to store the fire-lighters in a glass jar filled with methylated spirit.

    2. Slide the Turboslide to the far right or far left position. This opens the air hole inside the door and allows air to flow through acting like an old fashioned pair of bellows.

    3. Place DRY kindling and a few small logs lengthways in the front of the fire chamber leaving a clear space in front of the air inlet hole.

    4. Place a soaked fire starter just under the kindling at the front of the fire chamber and light it. Try to avoid dripping methylated spirit on to any surface when doing this as it can discolour some hearth materials.

    5. Close the door.

    6. Once the fire is burning really well and you have a nice bed of hot embers, move the Turboslide to the central position (to cover the air inlet hole), this can be done slowly in several stages if preferred.

    7. When opening the door to load more wood, slide the Turboslide to the far left or right open position, and continue as in number 6.

  4. How does the Pyroclassic IV burn overnight? 28/10/2020

    The overnight burn ability of the Pyroclassic IV is 100% dependent on the quality and size of fuel you put in it.

    You will need to have a good ember bed established, then add 2 or 3 dry hardwood logs (preferably Kanuka) measuring approximately 400mm long by 120mm thick into the fire box. Allow the flames to establish on the front ends of the logs and then ensure the turboslide is fully closed meaning the air flow into the fire is controlled by the fire itself. The further back in the fire chamber you have the fire the longer it will burn for.

    Remember, you need to add a kilo of fuel for every hour burn time required. If you follow these instructions you should have some hot embers left in the back of the fire chamber in the morning ready to be brought forward to establish another fire.

    As a point of caution you should never insert a fresh log which is too large or placed in the fire too late to ensure a flaming combustion, doing this will cook the wood fuel on the remaining embers releasing unburnt volatile gases into the combustion chamber which will eventually reach a point of ignition, this can result in a sizable explosion inside the fire chamber and may cause damage to the unit.

  5. What type of flue do you recommend? 28/10/2020

    We recommend a 150mm flue kit for your Pyroclassic Fire.

    As we are a carboNZero certified organisation, we are not keen to support the unnecessary freight of bulky flue components great distances when there are comparable products available from reputable manufacturers in your locality. Please speak to your local Pyroclassic agent about the Flue Kit options available to you in your area.

  6. Can I use other tools in my Pyroclassic fire chamber? 28/10/2020

    Depending on how the fire is used, the surface of the cylinder can wear and erode over time. This can be accelerated through using the wrong tools, such as a flat shovel to remove ash (shown below). As you can see, this has resulted in two carved grooves in the ceramic. Although this is not ideal, it is not of a major concern as the cylinder wall is over 35mm thick so it will not compromise the integrity of the structure and the surface can easily be repaired through the application of veneering cement, which can be purchased from our Online Shop.

     

     

    Pyroclassic incorrect tooling

    Pyroclassic incorrect tooling 2

  7. How do I clean the outside of the Pyroclassic and the flue pipes? 28/10/2020

    The powder coated panels on the Pyroclassic IV can be wiped clean with some light detergent and warm water.  You can choose to do this with the panels on the fire or remove them for a more thorough cleaning. Be careful when you remove the front panel to not tear the insulating gasket which is on the inside of the panel: you will need to pull the centre of the panel forward slightly to allow it to clear the space behind it when you slide it up.

    The stainless steel flue pipe can be cleaned using a soft cloth with a small amount of methylated spirits soaked into it. Try to avoid touching the flue pipe with your bare hands as this leaves oils from the skin on the pipe and becomes very hard to remove once the pipes have been heat cycled.

     

     

  8. How are wood fires authorised? 27/10/2020

    There are two steps a woodburner model needs to go through to be authorised:

    1. The emissions and efficiency of the model are tested by a laboratory. The laboratory issues a test report which states the results of the test.
    2. An independent body (Environment Canterbury or the Nelson City Council) physically checks the model against the test report and gives the model an authorisation number.

    An alternative authorisation stream was introduced in June 2011 for models of burners that cannot be tested using the prescribed testing protocol. It enables burners to demonstrate compliance with the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality using a functionally equivalent method.

    See Authorisation procedure for functionally equivalent methods [PDF, 495 KB] [Environment Canterbury's website]

     

    See more information at http://www.mfe.govt.nz/air/national-environmental-standards-air-quality

     

     

  9. How do I use my moisture meter? 27/10/2020

    The moisture meter is intended to be used regularly throughout the drying process, from when you first get your wood fuel delivered right through to just before burning it. It will allow you to know exactly what the moisture content of the wood fuel you are using is and it will ensure that if used correctly your new fire will be able to perform well. Poor quality wood fuel is the number one cause of issues with all wood fires and flue systems.

  10. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 27/10/2020

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire.

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful. The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.