Help Centre

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  1. Door knob troubleshooting 18/02/2019

    The expected lifespan of a door knob is somewhere between 4 - 10 years depending on how the fire is being operated.

    The door handle will get hot during operation and this is completely normal.

    There are two typical known causes of premature failure of the door knob. The first is excessive charring on the back of the knob due to high levels of concentrated heat from burning close behind the door area. The second cause can be due to the door being over-tightened when it is closed which in turn leads to it being very tight to open once the fire has heated up. The continued cycle of this over-tightening causes the screws to become weakened from the higher levels of load put on them in each direction each time, which eventually results in it coming loose and breaking away from their fixings.

     

    A combination of these two is actually the most common cause of door knob failure. To avoid these issues and extend the lifespan of the door knob, keep a clear area of approximately 10cm in the front of the firebox and maintain your fire underneath the air tubes in the top of the cylinder, this will give the additional benefit of letting the cylinder absorb the maximum amount of heat from your fuel load before it leaves the fire chamber.

    If you are finding the door knob too hot when trying to refuel your fire then you are probably trying to refuel too soon, the door knob is a great indicator of what’s happening within your fire so if you can’t reload then you don’t need to yet. If your door knob is starting to show signs of charring then you are probably burning your fire too close to the door. 

    Do not lean on the door or use it to help you stand up when it is open as this can cause the door to move. If your door does become misaligned then you will need to loosen the top bolt going horizontally through the hinge bar and lift the door back into the correct position for the spindle to line up and then re-tighten the bolt.

  2. Can I cook on the top? 18/02/2019

    Yes you can cook on the 10mm thick steel top plate of the fire once a good fire has been established inside the fire chamber. You can use this area for all manner of cooking or warming. The cooktop oven provides better control and more versatility with cooking, which can be purchased from our online shop.

    Cook top area measures 0.26m2

     

  3. Why has the top plate dropped down at the front and ridden up at back and the insulating wool is visible? 18/02/2019

    The top plate may have dropped due to the front layers of insulating gasket moving out of position. This could be for a number of reasons but most often is due to a disturbance during sweeping.

    If the layers of white gasket material are still intact they can be relocated back into position. If not then new sealing strips can be ordered to replace these from our online shop.

     

  4. What does it mean by the Pyroclassic being 'Self Regulating'? 18/02/2019

    The vigorous fire near the loading door automatically slows down as the burning front advances through the firebox towards the back. Each cycle ends with ash and hot ember at the far end of the firebox. Only use the Turboslide when lighting, adding fresh fuel or if you quickly want a very vigorous fire. The Pyroclassic® IV not only provides heat soon after start up but it also stores a lot of the heat from burning your wood, you will get most of this heat back over several hours. Frequent reloading may result in high room temperatures but you will soon know how much and how often to add fuel, the best heater output control is how much and how often you do this. The Pyroclassic® IV is designed to save on firewood and to keep emission levels to the minimum by storing the surplus heat which normally goes up the chimney - this heat is still being released into the room even when the fire is low at the end of each burn cycle.

  5. Why does my Pyroclassic not get as hot as traditional 'black box' style wood fires? 18/02/2019

    The Pyroclassic is not a conventional radiant heater. As with all fires it can only generate the heat available from the fuel loaded into it and a single kilogram of wood fuel, soft or hard wood, carries the same calorific value by weight, so if a 'black box' fire is using 3kgs an hour of fuel and yours is using 2 then the other has 50% more heat being generated during the same period.

    A percentage of the heat from a 'black box' wood fire will be lost up the flue that would normally be captured in the ceramic cylinder of the Pyroclassic. However, this doesn’t generate more heat, it just recovers some of what might have been lost.

    If you want more heat then more fuel and air is the way to generate it. Load an extra piece of fuel in each time and leave the Turboslide open for a little longer, this will build more heat quicker and get the cylinder up to a higher temperature. 

    The maximum temperature wood fuel can combust at is 1100c and the cylinder wall in your Pyroclassic is capable of withstanding temps over 1500c so don’t worry about getting your fire too hot. The other components like the first section of flue and the coloured panels will show signs of high temp levels long before the cylinder.

     

     

  6. I would like to move my existing wood fire to another location within the same house? 18/02/2019

    An existing burner that is moved within a house is considered to be a newly installed burner, so it must meet the woodburner standards in the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality. You may also need a building consent.

     

    See more information at http://www.mfe.govt.nz/air/national-environmental-standards-air-quality

  7. How to replace the door to glass sealing gasket 18/02/2019

    Download the instructions here -  Replacing-Door-to-Glass-Sealing-Gasket.pdf

  8. What chimney sweeps can you recommend to clean the flue? 18/02/2019

    It would be great if we could keep an up to date national register of all the good chimney sweeps around the country but as you can imagine this is a somewhat transient profession and so a call through the good old yellow pages and an ask around some friends is usually the best course of action to get a sweep. 

    It is always worth asking them if they have done any local Pyroclassic fires before and if so can they tell you where so you can ask the homeowner how it went, any doubts and we are always happy to give some tips to proactive chimney sweeps.

     

  9. What size firewood should I be using in my Pyroclassic Fire? 18/02/2019

    Logs should be approximately 100- 120 mm in diameter by around 300mm - 400mm long for your Pyroclassic IV Fire.   

    Logs should be approximately 100-120 mm in diameter by around 200-250mm long for your Pyroclassic Mini Fire. 

     

     

  10. When and how should I clean the flue? 18/02/2019

    Pyroclassic Fires are renowned for burning very cleanly when dry fuel is used but you should still always clean your flue once a year. This is often a requirement for many insurance companies.

    Keeping your flue pipes clean will help eliminate the risk of a flue fire. Your flue is also a great indication of how your wood fuel is performing. If the pipes are clean then the wood is good, if the pipes are filling up with carbon, creosote and tar deposits then you may need to revisit the operating instructions and refresh yourself with how to create a cleaner burning fire.

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this, this stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. Sweeping the flue into the top chamber is never a good idea as it can restrict the flow of gasses from the primary fire chamber and cause your fire to perform poorly.

    To clean the top chamber and wetback, you will need to remove the top plate (it just lifts off) and clean out the top chamber of soot and creosote. Take care not to remove any of the Kaowool lining during cleaning and ensure that the gasket is all intact before replacing the top plate. Support the flue with a frame made of wood so you can easily remove the top plate.

    The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand. The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off so be careful as this can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system.