Help Centre

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  1. The front of my Pyroclassic fire has developed smoke stains on the panel. What can I do? 22/01/2021

    Depending on how extensive the marking is you may be able to remove it by using a light abrasive car polish. Remove the panel and place it on a kitchen bench as this will be much easier than doing it on the fire. Please be careful of the gasket if it's still attached to the back of the front panel when removing and replacing it. Please avoid handling the panel when hot. Always make sure the panel is cold. 

     

     

  2. Why do I need a Wall Screen or a Flue Shield? 22/01/2021

    Pyroclassic Fires can be installed with a double skin half round flue shield or for minimum clearances from combustible walls a correctly sized wall screen must be installed, the clearances for these are shown in the relevant Tech Spec sheet for each fire. 

    Alternatively you can install a Pyroclassic Fire without wall screens if you chose to use a non-combustible wall board product such as Eterpan, Supalux or Promina board and install it as per the manufacture specifications. Usually this involves ensuring a 25mm air gap is maintained between the wall board and any timber framing, through the bottom, up between the combustible surface and the screening material and out of the top.

    In some instances the wall may not contain any combustible material and therefore will not require any screening.

    Pyroclassic Wall Screens now have a simple keyhole hanging system to make installation very easy.

  3. Why is the Pyroclassic sometimes shown as having a 4kW heat output and sometimes 15kW? 22/01/2021

    The 4kW rating for the Pyroclassic IV comes from the efficiency and emissions testing procedure. This heat output test is a byproduct of other tests and it is acknowledged throughout the industry that this method of testing disadvantages fires with a higher thermal mass.

    In light of this the New Zealand Home Heating Association (NZHHA) established a standalone testing procedure specifically designed to measure the actual kW output of a fire in the laboratory environment. The Pyroclassic IV is only one of a few fires to have been tested with this procedure and the results have confirmed the Pyroclassic IV is capable of providing a genuine 15kW of heat for your home.

    A more accurate way of measuring how well a wood burner will heat you home in the real world is to look at the space heating rating which is usually shown in m2. The higher the area shown the better the fire will be to heat the whole home. The Pyroclassic IV is rated up to 250m2, which is one of the highest ratings of any domestic wood fire.

     

     

  4. How do I light my first fire? 22/01/2021

    1. Soak the reusable fire starters in methylated spirits. Tip: It is also handy to store the fire-lighters in a glass jar filled with methylated spirit.

    2. Slide the Turboslide to the far right or far left position. This opens the air hole inside the door and allows air to flow through acting like an old fashioned pair of bellows.

    3. Place DRY kindling and a few small logs lengthways in the front of the fire chamber leaving a clear space in front of the air inlet hole.

    4. Place a soaked fire starter just under the kindling at the front of the fire chamber and light it. Try to avoid dripping methylated spirit on to any surface when doing this as it can discolour some hearth materials.

    5. Close the door.

    6. Once the fire is burning really well and you have a nice bed of hot embers, move the Turboslide to the central position (to cover the air inlet hole), this can be done slowly in several stages if preferred.

    7. When opening the door to load more wood, slide the Turboslide to the far left or right open position, and continue as in number 6.

  5. What size firewood should I be using in my Pyroclassic Fire? 22/01/2021

    Logs should be approximately 100- 120 mm in diameter by around 300mm - 400mm long for your Pyroclassic IV Fire.   

    Logs should be approximately 100-120 mm in diameter by around 200-250mm long for your Pyroclassic Mini Fire. 

     

     

  6. Can you configure the flue to have an offset so it goes out the wall behind the fire rather than the roof? 22/01/2021

    Yes, offset bends are available for the flue systems. The best option would be to speak with a local installer who can give you specific advice about a flue system to suit your home.

    Do note that a general rule of thumb is to try and avoid having any offsets in the first length of flue pipe, no more than a 45 degree angle and no more than 600mm centre to centre of the offset. Offsets do require more maintenance with cleaning etc. and can have adverse effects on the fires performance versus a typical vertical flue.

     

     

  7. How do I find the serial number of the fire? 22/01/2021

    The serial number is printed on a metal plate at the back of the fire. To view the panel, simply slide it up to the left side and you will be able to view it from the front. 

     

    Back panel serial number

     

    Back panel serial number 2

  8. Door knob troubleshooting 22/01/2021

    The expected lifespan of a door knob is somewhere between 4 - 10 years depending on how the fire is being operated.

    The door handle will get hot during operation and this is completely normal.

    There are two typical known causes of premature failure of the door knob. The first is excessive charring on the back of the knob due to high levels of concentrated heat from burning close behind the door area. The second cause can be due to the door being over-tightened when it is closed which in turn leads to it being very tight to open once the fire has heated up. The continued cycle of this over-tightening causes the screws to become weakened from the higher levels of load put on them in each direction each time, which eventually results in it coming loose and breaking away from their fixings.

     

    A combination of these two is actually the most common cause of door knob failure. To avoid these issues and extend the lifespan of the door knob, keep a clear area of approximately 10cm in the front of the firebox and maintain your fire underneath the air tubes in the top of the cylinder, this will give the additional benefit of letting the cylinder absorb the maximum amount of heat from your fuel load before it leaves the fire chamber.

    If you are finding the door knob too hot when trying to refuel your fire then you are probably trying to refuel too soon, the door knob is a great indicator of what’s happening within your fire so if you can’t reload then you don’t need to yet. If your door knob is starting to show signs of charring then you are probably burning your fire too close to the door. 

    Do not lean on the door or use it to help you stand up when it is open as this can cause the door to move. If your door does become misaligned then you will need to loosen the top bolt going horizontally through the hinge bar and lift the door back into the correct position for the spindle to line up and then re-tighten the bolt.

  9. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 22/01/2021

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire.

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful. The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

  10. How much does it cost? 22/01/2021

    To download the RRP price list of our Pyroclassic wood fire and accessories, click HERE.