Help Centre

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  1. My fire is slow to start up. What can I do? 24/02/2018

    • Open the Turboslide by moving it to the far left or right position.
    • Check the start-up hole is free of ash and char on the inside, push back any build-up with the rake. The start-up air supply hole allows air to enter the fire chamber like a pair of old fashioned bellows, if the hole is clogged with ash and char it will not work. 
    • Check for air leakage around the cook top, around the flue collar and in the flue pipe joints. Air bypassing the fire chamber reduces draft. Repair any air leaks.
    • Slow start up can occur if you are fueling the fire with large or wet logs or loading onto too few hot coals. Use dry kindling to start fire quickly. DO NOT USE WET FUEL.
    • Insufficient draft. Review chimney construction and investigate air pressure levels in the home.
    • Warm, humid conditions outside or an inversion layer. Wait until the flue pipe heats-up.

  2. Who should I use to install the fire? 24/02/2018

    As a responsible manufacturer we recommend that all our fires are installed by a New Zealand Home Heating Association approved installer. This will ensure the fire is installed correctly and safely and will provide many years of worry free comfort.

  3. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 24/02/2018

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire. 

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful. 

  4. Why are gases and smoke entering the room when the door is opened? 24/02/2018

    The most likely reason for this is that your flue is clogged and may require sweeping.

    Other possible causes:

    • You could have a very cold flue temperature. Allow initial start up fire to warm flue pipes. 
    • Loading door opened during maximum degassing of fuel. Wait until flames disappear.

     

  5. What are the clearances for a Pyroclassic IV installed on a mini raised woodbin? 24/02/2018

    You can download the installation clearances for installing a Pyroclassic IV on a mini raised woodbin HERE. 

  6. Can I put a natural tile on the wall instead of the wall screens? Does this comply with the 'non combustible wall' requirements? 24/02/2018

    Any non-combustible mineral board that is directly fixed to a combustible material like timber immediately loses its non-combustible qualities and therefore the full clearances must be applied. If this board were to be packed 25mm off the combustible material underneath and then ventilated top and bottom with 25mm air gaps then this would become a non-combustible wall covering. This can be covered with any other non-combustible material you like such as tiles etc.

    As a note of caution please be aware that Fireline Gib is not a non-combustible wall covering. 

  7. More information about the 2 hectare rule under the NES 24/02/2018

    Most urban areas in New Zealand experience air pollution during winter. Our focus is on improving air quality in those areas. Urban areas typically have smaller property sizes and as there is no nationally consistent definition for an urban environment, a property size of less than 2 hectares was used. The standard two hectare rule applies throughout New Zealand including rural areas.

     

    See more information at http://www.mfe.govt.nz/air/national-environmental-standards-air-quality

  8. Can you configure the flue to have an offset so it goes out the wall behind the fire rather than the roof? 24/02/2018

    Yes, offset bends are available for the flue systems. The best option would be to speak with a local installer who can give you specific advice about a flue system to suit your home.

    Do note that a general rule of thumb is to try and avoid having any offsets in the first length of flue pipe, no more than a 45 degree angle and no more than 600mm centre to centre of the offset. Offsets do require more maintenance with cleaning etc. and can have adverse effects on the fires performance versus a typical vertical flue.

     

  9. How does the Pyroclassic IV burn overnight? 24/02/2018

    The overnight burn ability of the Pyroclassic IV is 100% dependent on the quality and size of fuel you put in it.

    You will need to have a good ember bed established, then add 2 or 3 dry hardwood logs (preferably Kanuka) measuring approximately 400mm long by 120mm thick into the fire box. Allow the flames to establish on the front ends of the logs and then ensure the turboslide is fully closed meaning the air flow into the fire is controlled by the fire itself. The further back in the fire chamber you have the fire the longer it will burn for.

    Remember, you need to add a kilo of fuel for every hour burn time required. If you follow these instructions you should have some hot embers left in the back of the fire chamber in the morning ready to be brought forward to establish another fire.

    As a point of caution you should never insert a fresh log which is too large or placed in the fire too late to ensure a flaming combustion, doing this will cook the wood fuel on the remaining embers releasing unburnt volatile gases into the combustion chamber which will eventually reach a point of ignition, this can result in a sizable explosion inside the fire chamber and may cause damage to the unit.

  10. Why is smoke coming from my Pyroclassic fire into my room? 24/02/2018

    There are a few reasons why this could be happening:

    • Negative pressure in the room - this can be caused by a household electric exhaust fan or severe pressure difference in a windstorm. Open a window to equalise the pressure.
    • Severe down draft due to surrounding structures, hills, trees or roof layout.
    • Most commonly, this is an indication your flue is blocked. Clear the obstruction and investigate the cause. Check the moisture of your wood and make sure you are burning good, dry wood. The flue pipe can block very quickly if you are burning wet or gummy wood. Make sure you are using a reliable chimney sweep as the Pyroclassic is different from other wood fires. 

     Down draft causes

    Download down draft troubleshooting info HERE.