Help Centre

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  1. Can I use a heat transfer kit? 21/08/2018

    The simple answer is yes.

    The thing with heat transfer kits is they work well with excess heat. The Pyroclassic IV produces a different kind of heat than your traditional 'black box' style wood fire. The black box fires spit out heat almost instantly as long as you keep refueling it regularly so will therefore provide you with excess heat which is why heat transfer kits are useful for these kind of fires. The Pyro on the other hand takes longer to heat up but once up to temperature retains this heat like a kiln and gives off a lovely, warm more consistent heat with less fuel needed once the cylindrical ceramic fire chamber is hot. Many Pyro customers find this as the biggest advantage of a Pyro and have it going for 2-3 months solid during winter. However, it won't necessarily provide lots of excess heat for use in a transfer system. Our recommendation is to install the Pyro first before the transfer system as you may likely find you don't require one.

    It is worth noting that in newer homes which have much better seals around doors and windows these kits can cause a negative pressure to build up in the room the fire is in as all the air is being sucked out. This results in the fire being starved of air and in some cases has even caused smoke from the starving fire being drawn back into the room. This same effect can also be caused by powerful range hoods and other fan forced systems in newer, more airtight housing.

    If you are building a very airtight home, we recommend you put in an air vent, approximately the size of a fire brick. The Pyroclassic IV needs 3.6 cubic metres of air per kilogram of wood to operate effectively. 

     

  2. What are the technical specifications of the Pyroclassic IV? 21/08/2018

    Please see the last page of the Pyroclassic IV brochure, which can be downloaded HERE.

  3. Why does my Pyroclassic not get as hot as traditional 'black box' style wood fires? 21/08/2018

    The Pyroclassic is not a conventional radiant heater. As with all fires it can only generate the heat available from the fuel loaded into it and a single kilogram of wood fuel, soft or hard wood, carries the same calorific value by weight, so if a 'black box' fire is using 3kgs an hour of fuel and yours is using 2 then the other has 50% more heat being generated during the same period.

    A percentage of the heat from a 'black box' wood fire will be lost up the flue that would normally be captured in the ceramic cylinder of the Pyro. However, this doesn’t generate more heat, it just recovers some of what might have been lost.

    If you want more heat then more fuel and air is the way to generate it. Load an extra piece of fuel in each time and leave the Turboslide open for a little longer, this will build more heat quicker and get the cylinder up to a higher temperature. 

    The maximum temperature wood fuel can combust at is 1100c and the cylinder wall in your Pyro is capable of withstanding temps over 1500c so don’t worry about getting your fire too hot. The other components like the first section of flue and the coloured panels will show signs of high temp levels long before the cylinder.

  4. Why is my Pyroclassic using more wood than I thought it would? 21/08/2018

    This could be because the loading door is not airtight. Check the gasket - if you need a replacement, you can purchase one from our Parts Shop.

    Another common cause of this is incorrect operation. Remember the Pyroclassic IV's significant heat storage capacity. Add logs less often and burn fuel further back in the fire chamber.

    Lastly, this can happen if the Turboslide is being left open for long periods. If this is the case, go to our Resources Page and download our operating instructions and read about how to use it correctly. 

  5. Why is smoke coming from my Pyroclassic fire into my room? 21/08/2018

    There are a few reasons why this could be happening:

    • Negative pressure in the room - this can be caused by a household electric exhaust fan or severe pressure difference in a windstorm. Open a window to equalise the pressure.
    • Severe down draft due to surrounding structures, hills, trees or roof layout.
    • Most commonly, this is an indication your flue is blocked. Clear the obstruction and investigate the cause. Check the moisture of your wood and make sure you are burning good, dry wood. The flue pipe can block very quickly if you are burning wet or gummy wood. Make sure you are using a reliable chimney sweep as the Pyroclassic is different from other wood fires. 

     Down draft causes

    Download down draft troubleshooting info HERE.

  6. How often do I need to clean out the ash? 21/08/2018

    The chamber in the Pyroclassic IV can operate with or without ash in it. However, it is preferential to empty this out every week or when the ash builds up to the extent that it could inhibit the operation of the Turboslide.

  7. My Pyroclassic door gasket has moved out of place. What do I do? 21/08/2018

    The door to glass sealing gasket can occasionally walk along the back of the door. This happens due to the screws not quite holding enough tension on the door glass and so during the expansion and contraction process the gasket gets moved along a fraction each time.

    This can be realigned by loosening the screws off and shifting it back into position so long as it’s not to stretched out. If it is damaged or stretched then it is easier to buy a new one and start again making sure to check the screw tension after a few weeks to adjust them back up to tension again. This gasket can be purchased from our Online Shop.

  8. Why have Pyroclassic fires dropped from No. 1 on Consumer NZ tests on their last report? 21/08/2018

    Consumer Magazine recently changed the way fires are rated. This has caused some issues across the industry as what were considered the 'best' fires are now not rated near the top...like the Pyroclassic IV. They have changed the weightings of their review to focus more on price for output over emissions and efficiency as they believe this is more in line with what the customer wants.

    This has resulted in a list which is more about heat output for dollars spent rather than which fires actually perform the best. It also makes no provision for servicing costs, warranty duration or expected life of the appliance and its components.

    The statement we have printed in our marketing material - 'Consistently chosen as the top pick for wood fires in all Consumer reviews' refers to the consumer reviews across various formats in NZ, Australia and the UK over the last 30 plus years including true consumer feedback.

  9. What are the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality? 21/08/2018

    The National Environmental Standards for Air Quality (NES) are regulations made under the Resource Management Act 1991 which aim to set a guaranteed minimum level of health protection for all New Zealanders.

    The NES came into effect on 8 October 2004. They are made up of 14 separate but interlinked standards.

    These include:

    • Seven standards banning activities that discharge significant quantities of dioxins and other toxics into the air
    • Five standards for ambient (outdoor) air quality
    • A design standard for new wood burners installed in urban areas
    • A requirement for landfills over 1 million tonnes of refuse to collect greenhouse gas emissions

  10. How do I light my first fire? 21/08/2018

    1. Soak the reusable fire starters in methylated spirits. Tip: It is also handy to store the fire-lighters in a glass jar filled with methylated spirits.


    2. Slide the Turboslide to the far right or far left position. This opens the air hole inside the door and allows air to flow through acting like an old fashioned pair of bellows.


    3. Place DRY kindling and a few small logs lengthways in the front of the fire chamber leaving a clear space in front of the air inlet hole.


    4. Place a soaked fire starter just under the kindling at the front of the fire chamber and light it. Try to avoid dripping methylated sprirts on to any surface when doing this as it can discolour some hearth materials.


    5. Close the door.


    6. Once the fire is burning really well and you have a nice bed of hot embers, move the Turboslide to the central position (to cover the air inlet hole), this can be done slowly in several stages if preferred.


    7. When opening the door to load more wood, slide the Turboslide to the far left or right open position, and continue as in number 6.